Thursday, August 12, 2010

Ballseye's Gun Shots 81 - Ammo Prices Falling?

Oh happy days, it seems that the indications are that prices for ammunition may be falling. "What indications are those?" say you. I answer: "The current retail prices are indications enough for me'. Let's take a look at some of them:

AmmoMan.com has Wolf 7.62x39 in either FMJ or JHP going at 1,000 rounds for $219.00 (including shipping). That is a pretty good price. I have not seen the price that low in awhile, it was certainly not that low when I last purchased it. If I remember right, my last purchase of a thousand rounds in this caliber was on August 1, 2009, almost exactly one year ago, and the price was $249.99 shipped from CenterfireSystems.com. They had the lowest price by quite a bit back then, AmmoMan had it for $279 shipped right around the same time and SportsmansGuide.com had it at about $314 back then. Back to today's price, the $219 shipped available at AmmoMan now is about a 12% price drop in a year as compared to the best price I could find back then. Not the greatest savings but certainly substantial. Had I waited until now to buy that thousand rounds, well I could have used the money I would have saved to buy a decent case of beer, something like Pilsner Urquell but who could have known when the price would come down some.

Other ammo prices also seem to be falling somewhat. Not all that long ago, the SportsmansGuide.com was offering Remington Core-Lokt in .35 Rem. at about $24.97 a box of 20 plus shipping. I just ordered 100 rounds of it (5 boxes), a few days ago, at a price of only $20.78 per box plus shipping. That is almost a 17% savings and I was sure to get in on it.
Ammunition To Go has CCI Blazer .22LR, 40gr. solid points, 5,000 rounds for $189.99. That is not as good as it should be but is not a bad price and i think it has come down a couple of dollars from what I saw a few months ago when I picked up 2,500 rounds for $111 from another dealer and that was the best price I could find for 2,500 rounds then. While there is often a discount when buying 5,ooo rounds as compared to 2,500, you can bet it is not near as much as a $32 difference in price between the two. So, yes I am sure it's price has come down too.

I also recently purchased 100 rounds of 8MM Mauser ammo. If I recall correctly Sellier & Bellot 8x57JS, 196 Gr. SPCE, was priced at $19.68 per box of 20 rounds at Natchez Shooters Supplies. It is now going for $18.49 per box. That is a savings of $5.95, or about 6%, for 100 rounds.

I also just bought a couple of 100 round boxes of CCI Mini Mag, .22LR, round nose ammo, standard velocity, for $6.79 a box at a dealer in PA. The least expensive I have seen this go for at a dealer, including at gun shows, over the past several months has been about $6.99 a box with it usually going for about $7.29 or more per box of 100 rounds. Again a decent savings percentage wise, about 5.5% from the lowest then til the lowest now.

So, it seems to me that ammunition prices are falling somewhat. This could be a result of recent Supreme Court decisions relative to the 2nd Amendment. Those decisions have made it much more difficult for the anti-gun crowd to enact further legislation baning guns and ammo. It has put the brakes on the Obama administration from doing so by way of legislation (though remember they will try by way of treaties made with other nations such as those in the UN). As a result, people who shoot may not be buying up as much ammo to hoard it as they obviously had been just a short while ago. If we vote the bums out of Congress this fall, we stand a chance that our liberties and rights will be strengthened and that prices such as those for ammo will fall even further once the fears of them denying us our rights have subsided in their absence.
Of course, there can be other reasons that ammo prices have dropped but whatever the reason it appears to be a good thing and hopefully a downward trend in ammunition prices will lead to much more affordable ammo.

As for me, I would like to take further advantage of the lower prices but just paid my son's college tuition (half of it anyhow) with a credit card and have to get that paid off pronto. I also have a few medical bills still due from my surgery back at the end of may and need to get them paid off too. So it is not likely I will be buying a lot of ammo in the near future although I may not be able to resist if the prices fall even more in the near future and I have been squirreling away a bit of change and dollar bills now and then. Oh for the days of 1,000 rounds of Wolf 7.62x39 JHP ammo at $179 per thousand to come round again.

All the best,
Glenn B

A Farewell To Arms (or at least to a certain longarm)

In the midst of a heat wave, in the mid summer of this year, I shot for qualification at a range on an island that looked across the bay and and outer counties to the mountainous towers of steel, glass and concrete that are the heart of the city. Though there have been other places, this one has been the one place, where I have qualified the most in over a quarter century. In all that time, while there may have been a rare exception, I cannot recall a single qualification day when I did not shoot a Remington 870 Shotgun. Today, I said farewell to that firearm, it is the first time in memory that I did not shoot one for qualification.

It's not that I have lost any of my faith in this fine weapon as being just that - a fine weapon - nor have I begun to think that it would not be among the best of choices as a primary weapon when on a high risk operation, it is more along the lines that I feel I need to start to wind down in preparation for my retirement. Actually, my decision to turn in the shotgun, is a bit more complicated than that and also has to do with some recent politics in the office that have disenchanted me and therefore had me wondering if it is worth it to me to maintain the additional responsibility of being assigned such a gun. Without me going into the details of the politics, allow me to simply say, I decided that if my agency was not able to overcome the muddled bureaucratic nightmare of indecisive micromanagement and instead show some intelligent decision making ability based upon good old fashioned respect for its workers and the level of responsibility they exhibit with firearms, well then it was time for me to put aside the additional responsibility of carrying this particular gun. No I did not have any type of problem with the gun, nor with it having been issued to me, nor with any use of it; I just want to make that clear. The issue was something different but it was an eye opener and enough to make me realize that under the current administration within my office, I probably would be a fool to continue to maintain the additional responsibility of being issued this gun. So, with a good deal of regret, and not any less of a feeling that I was losing an old friend, I decided I would turn it in this quarter.

I miss it already and it has been only the first qualification day without my shooting it. I can live without it though, without the added responsibility of maintaining it or having to qualify with it and without the bruised shoulder that it causes almost every time I shoot it tactically at the range. I have arthritis and bursitis (and maybe other damage) in my right shoulder and wish I had filed the necessary paperwork to report an injury every time I got a bruise from shooting it (especially since my shoulder has never otherwise been injured that I can remember). That way I would never have to worry about paying for the medical bills for the shoulder but I never did file those forms and if it needs fixing now then I guess I'll have to foot the bills instead of worker's comp. I figured all those bruises on my shoulder, the aches and pains, the soreness were all just part of the job and the responsibility and would all be worth it in the long run should I ever actually have needed to fire the shotgun in defense of myself or another agent on my job. As it is, while I carried it on arrest operations and such many times over the years, and was all to often the first in the door, I never once needed to fire it except at the range. I hope, in the relatively short time I have remaining on my job, I will not find myself in a situation where I need it and do not have it.


It is just that the bureaucracy in my office has become unbearable and finally gotten me to the point where any added responsibility, with little or no respect for it, or appreciation of it, is just not worth it to me - the shotgun being just one example. In addition, as I said above, I need to get into the wind down mode looking toward a not too distant retirement. While I have always welcomed a good deal of additional responsibility on my job, and have volunteered for things beyond the scope of most of my coworkers, extra responsibility at this point is not something I need on my shoulders since it seems to me as if my job is discouraging me from taking it on or continuing it.

Did I mention I miss it already? Farewell old friend.

All the best,
Glenn B